Amy Hall

Amy is 22 and entering her final year studying for her MSci Zoology degree with the University of Exeter.

After studying osprey migration for her dissertation she is looking forward to turning to insect migration for her masters. Following her studies Amy hopes to pursue a career in science communication, and expand on her videography skills. You can check out her work so far on her YouTube channel at Amy Hall Wildlife!

Amy Hall

Posts

  • eBird and Bird Track- Bringing ornithology into the 21st century

    Ornithology is an ancient practise, reflecting a long held fascination in the avian aspect of our natural world. Look at early art from almost any culture, and there will be a depiction of a bird, or several. The winged wonders of the world, it is easy to see why early people were so fascinated with their behaviour and appearance. Imagine we don’t have our modern comprehension of where birds go when they migrate, or how some species achieve incredible architectural feats (like bowerbirds …

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  • Gorgeous glow worms

    One of my wildlife highlights of the summer is actually something that draws me out after the long sunny days, as it can only be appreciated after dark.

    Of course, I am talking about glow worms (Lampyris noctiluca) which I have been enjoying for quite a few years now. In the evenings of June and July, limestone rich grasslands (and other suitable habitats) can appear to sparkle as you walk through.

    The bioluminescent glow, produced by a chemical reaction between luciferin and oxygen, is …

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  • HOS Bird and Nature weekend 2018

    The HOS and Cameron Bespolka Trust Young Birder's Camp 2018. Special thanks to Wild New Forest for organising the field work!!

     

     Read more about a great weekend here

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  • Goldcrests VS Firecrests

    Winter in the UK brings with it some interesting migrant species, particularly the influx of Hawfinches earlier on in the winter, however my highlight of the winter in Cornwall was the increase in the numbers of Firecrests on campus.

    These gorgeous little birds are very similar to Goldcrests, but have much more vibrant and impressive plumage. The species name in their scientific binomial (Regulus ignicapillus) is derived from the words fire (ignis) and hair (capillus) which becomes evident …

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  • Birdfair 2017

    The British Birdwatching Fair is a highlight of the year for my local reserve, Rutland Water, as it hosts thousands of visitors from all over the world to share in their passion for birds.

    I have been fortunate to attend the fair quite a few times due to it being in my home county, and every year I revel in the colourful and lively event and all that it has to offer.

    In the past few years I have attended the fair as a volunteer, taking on various roles to help the weekend run as smoothly as …

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  • White stork- Their heritage in the UK and potential future

    Almost a fortnight ago, my Twitter feed lit up with photos and reports of the white stork which had been spotted at Rutland Water, my local reserve. This was super exciting being the second record for the reserve, and although I missed it I wanted to find out a bit more about this species which has a history in the UK, as well as some interesting folklore here and around the world.

    The white stork (Ciconia ciconia) is now extinct from Britain due to persecution (as a symbol of Christianity), …

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  • The Beautiful Everyday

    After mock exams I have been feeling rather deflated and lacking in inspiration, however whilst reflecting on my week I thought about how I could make exams more bearable. With real exams looming in the future, and university coming over the horizon in September (yay!) I really need the motivation to complete my exams and achieve my grades. Where better to find inspiration than the everyday wildlife which we see regularly?

    I started my quest for knowledge with birds, and particularly their …

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